Air Plant|Space Gardening

How to Grow Air Plants

Even though they are easy to care for, there are a few rules to follow when growing air plants:

  • Constant air circulation — as the name indicates — is paramount to keeping your plant happy.
  • Air plants need some moisture; from late spring to mid-autumn, mist daily. In winter, mist only once or twice a week.
  • Fertilize monthly in spring and summer using a low-nitrogen liquid fertilizer mixed at only one-quarter strength. In general, fertilize weakly.
  • Although they love warm weather, most air plants need protection from full sun. If it’s a type that grows naturally wild on trees, keep it in moist, partial shade. If it is a ground type, such as T. cyanea orT. lindenii, grow it indoors in bright, filtered light and outdoors in partial or dappled shade.
  • Don’t let an air plant sit somewhere that’s colder than 45 degrees; it will die at those temperatures. If you live in Zone 9 or warmer, you can grow an air plant outdoors all year if you keep it dry during the winter.

How to Use Air Plants

Air plants look great alone as architectural elements or in an air plants terrarium. Place varieties such asTillandsia aeranthos ‘Amethyst’, also called the rosy air plant, into a pot or against a container that will complement or contrast with its pink flower spike.

Play off the spikiness of the foliage by grouping three Tillandsia ionantha and add a tiny toucan, parasol, or other tropical touch.

Air plants that are naturally suited to growing in trees can be lashed against a protected wooden post using translucent fishing monofilament and a bit of sphagnum moss to add extra moisture. Tillandsia species also make fine companions on a planted branch with orchids since they like essentially the same conditions. Hanging air plants are a popular design element.

Here’s some ideas on how to display your air plant:

Air-plant-on-a-clean-lined-counter copy

 

il_fullxfull.358340816_gbh4 copy

 

6a00d8341c71c353ef019b028aac75970d-500wi copy

 

 

il_340x270.580934041_6bdx copy

 

 

exotic-arrangement-from-articulture copy

 

 

 

modern-plants copy

 

il_fullxfull.379750424_4zbp copy

 

I found this video very helpful and interesting. You can follow the link for clear instruction:

Advertisements

Miniature Waterfall In Your Terrarium|Space Gardening

573772a7033f70b245900ecc5d9f5ae7

Making a waterfall in your vivarium or terrarium is an easy way to add visual appeal. Your pet will love the increased humidity from a waterfall, and the water movement will facilitate beneficial bacterial growth in your substrate, keeping wastes down and your reptile’s or amphibian’s habitat clean and fresh. There are several basic steps involved in constructing a waterfall for your vivarium or terrarium.

Instruction:

1. Place your pump. Generally, place it in a back corner.

2. Install the tubing by attaching it to the pump. We strongly recommend using reinforced tubing. Use about 6″ more tubing than you think you’ll need – you don’t want to cover the end of the tubing with foam when you make your background.

3. Place any fake rock/wood/hardscape in place, then foam it with Great Stuff Gaps and Cracks filler. Wear gloves and protect your work surface!

4. Let the tank sit for about a week to allow the foam to cure.

5. Use a serrated steak knife to trim and rough up the foam. Carve it how you like, and make sure all surfaces are roughed up so silicone will stick better.

6. While wearing gloves, apply GE Silicone II Window + Door or aquarium safe silicone to the foam. Cover all exposed foam.

7. While the silicone is still wet, sprinkle on dry coconut fiber or sphagnum peat. Press the substrate in with gloved hands.

8. Stand the tank up and remove any loose coco fiber. Use silicone and dry coco fiber to cover any exposed patches of foam.

9. Let the silicone dry for several days, until there is no longer a vinegar smell to the tank.

10. Once cured, use a razor blade to scrape any excess silicone off of the glass. Then, use a shopvac to remove any extra coco fiber or bits of silicone that are not attached to the background. Using the razor blade, cut off any excess hose that sticks out of the background.

11. Add your substrates, and plant!

All About Terrariums|Space Gardening

What is a terrarium?

Terrariums are usually sealable glass containers that can be opened for maintenance and to access the plants inside. However, this is not essential; terrariums can also be madials, and some are open to the atmosphere rather than being sealed. Terrariums are often kept as decorative or ornamental items in the same way as aquariums.

Terrarium1

Classification:

Closed terrariums create a unique environment for plant growth, as the transparent walls allow for both heat and light to enter the terrarium. The sealed container combined with the heat entering the terrarium allows for the creation of a small scale water cycle. This happens because moisture from both the soil and plants evaporates in the elevated temperatures inside the terrarium. This water vapour then condenses on the walls of the container, and eventually falls back to the plants and soil below. This contributes to creating an ideal environment for growing plants due to the constant supply of water, thereby preventing the plants from becoming over dry. In addition to this, the light that passes through the transparent material of the terrarium allows for the plants within to photosynthesis, an important aspect of plant growth.

Ter2