Wheatgrass Decoration|Space Gardening

Wheat grass centerpiece is not a new concept. I liked this idea very much, so thought to share with you all. You can use wheat grass to decorate your house when it is a party, wedding, birthday or even in Easter. Here’s what you will need to grow your own wheat grass at home.

Supply List:

  • Potting soil
  • tiny rocks or gravel
  • scissors
  • grosgrain ribbon
  • 1 cup of hard red wheat
  • 7-9 tea cups or other fun small containers for planting

For this project, I grew wheat grass in soil.

Growing Wheat Grass in Soil

Kids can complete most of these steps with your supervision and they love this project because the grass grows so quickly, it actually holds their interest.

1. Soak 1/2 cup of seeds in water for 24 hours (you can leave it for up to 48 hours if you tend to get distracted like me, and still plant it).

2. Put some gravel or very small rocks in the bottom of your container for drainage (I tried skipping this step once and my grass roots got moldy)

3. Fill it with soil, leaving about 1/2 inch of space at the top of the container and add a little water ( if your kids are doing this part, they may need a little help measuring, as you’ll see below 😉

4. Spread your seeds on top of the soil. You want your grass to be dense, so the whole surface of your soil should be covered with seeds, but they shouldn’t piled on top of each other. You may have left over seeds depending on the size of your planters.

5. Cover the seeds with a very thin layer of soil- just enough so they aren’t exposed.

6. Water twice a day.

7. Within about 48 hours, you should see little green sprouts- very exciting!

8. Transfer your planters to a sunny spot (near a window) and keep the soil moist. Watering 1/4 cup per planter, twice a day, worked well for me.

9. By day 10 you should have a very healthy crop of grass

10. Give it a hair cut (my daughter loved this part) and show it off.

Here are some ideas on how you can use wheat grass for decoration:
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easter-decoration-ideas-wheat-grass-table-centerpiece
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image004.11.02.83.34 Tulips-&-Grass
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Wheat-Grass-decoration-for-Easter-1024x746

Indoor Crocus Bulb|Space Gardening

force-bulbs-grow-indoors-ftr

Crocus flowers are among the first to herald spring, sometimes popping their bright blooms through the snow. Fortunately, we don’t have to wait till spring to enjoy these glorious flowers. Growing crocus indoors is easy to do by forcing them into bloom mid-winter. Start the process in fall — October is an ideal time. A crocus bulb is actually a corm. Corms produce beautiful cup-shaped blooms in purple, lavender, white or yellow — plain or striped — each with a bright orange stigma. All have slender, upright leaves that are green and white striped.

crocus

Crocuses need a cold treatment for 12 weeks to bloom. If you bought pre-chilled corms, you can skip this step.

  1. Choose a shallow pot (at least 3 in/7 cm deep) with drainage holes in the bottom. Fill the pot loosely with potting mix. Set several corms side by side — close but not touching — pointed end up. Set corms so that their tips are even with pot rim. Do not press the corms into the mix. It should be loose so the roots can grow through it easily. Cover with additional potting mix until just barely covered.
  2. Water thoroughly and discard drainage.
  3. Move pot to a dark, cool, but not freezing, (40°F/4°C) location such as a basement, unheated garage or refrigerator. Avoid storing corms near ripening fruit or vegetables which give off ethylene gas which can damage the corms. Keep them in cold storage for about 12 weeks. Keep the medium barely moist.
  4. When shoots reach about 2 in (5 cm) tall, bring the pot out of cold storage and place it in a slightly warmer (50°F/10°C) location with low light intensity. Over the next few days, gradually move it toward a sunny window. Turn the pot every day for even growth. When in full bloom, keep crocuses in a bright location out of direct sun to prolong the bloom.

Crocus Care Tips

crocus, crocus bulbs, crocus flowersOrigin: Hybrids with corms originating from Europe, North Africa and Asia

Height: Up to 8 in (20 cm)

Light: Keep in a dark location during cold treatment. Cover pot with a box, pot or black garbage bag if necessary. After shoots appear, move to bright light with some direct sun as directed above.

Water: Water sparingly until growth appears, then water enough to keep soil evenly moist. Flowering plants are thirsty, so check them often.

Humidity: Average room humidity.

Temperature: Cool to average (40-60°F/6-16°C)

Soil: Any good potting mix.

Fertilizer: Feed monthly with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half from planting until start of blooming. Do not fertilize while plants are in bloom.

Propagation: Corms will not bloom a second time indoors. They do produce offsets, but they take a few years to mature. If you want to keep them, allow the foliage to die back naturally, then store them in a cool, dry place. Plant the corms in your flower garden in the fall and let Mother Nature take care of them. They’ll bloom when they’re ready.

 

Types Of Ferns To Grow Indoor|Space Gardening

crocodile fern

Crocodile Fern

1. Crocodile Fern:

We love this fern’s interesting texture. The bright green fronds have a decidedly reptilian look and it’s not tough to see where the common name comes from. It makes a bold statement: At maturity, each frond can reach 3 feet long.

Name: Microsorium musifolium ‘Crocodyllus’
Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity
Size: To 4 feet tall and wide

Lemon-button-fern-in-a-terracotta-pot

Lemon Button Fern

2. Lemon Button Fern:

Lemon button fern produces cute, golden-green fronds with rounded edges (that give it the buttonlike appearance). It’s an easy-to-grow fern that fits in well with a lot of decorating styles.

Name: Nephrolepis cordifolia ‘Lemon Button’

Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity

Size: To 3 feet tall and 4 feet wide

maidenhair fern

Maidenhair Fern

3. Maidenhair Fern:

Among the most loved ferns, maidenhairs offer fine-textured fronds on black stalks. The arching fronds emerge light green and darken a bit as they age.

Name: Adiantum raddianum ‘Fritz Luth’

Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity

Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

rabit's foot fern

Rabit’s Foot Fern

4. Rabbit’s-Foot Fern:

This slow-growing fern offers dark green, fine textured fronds and fuzzy stems that creep down over the pot or along the soil. These stems are what gives the fern its delightful common name.

Name: Humata tyermanii
Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity
Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

staghorn fern

Staghorn Fern

5. Staghorn Fern:

Among the most spectacular of ferns, stag horns don’t need to be grown in soil so you often see them mounted and grown on walls or posts. They offer deep green, antler like fronds that definitely make a statement in your home’s decorating scheme.

Name: Platycerium bifurcatum

Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity

Size: To 6 feet tall and wide

birds-nest-fern

Birds Nest Fern

6. Bird’s Nest Fern:

Another of our favorites, bird’s nest fern is a slow-growing plant with bright green fronds that radiate from the center of the plant, creating a vase or bird’s nest shape. It’s versatile and easy to grow.

Name: Asplenium nidus
Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity
Size: To 5 feet tall and wide (but usually 1-2 feet indoors)

silver brake fern

Silver Brake Fern

7. Silver Brake Fern:

Create a distinctive look in your home with this fern. The crested fronds are almost spidery and bear a bright silvery stripe down the center.

Name: Pteris cretica ‘Mayi’
Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity
Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

kangaroo paw

Kangaroo Paw Fern

8. Kangaroo Paw Fern:

This interesting fern offers shiny, dark green fronds in an unkempt mound reminiscent of Medusa’s hair. Like rabbit’s-foot fern, it bears creeping stems that may grow down the side of its container!

Name: Microsorium diversifolium
Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity
Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

boston-fern1

Boston Fern

9. Boston Fern:

The most common indoor fern, Boston ferns are long-lived plants that can reach more than 5 feet tall and wide at maturity (though indoors they rarely reach that size). Fern breeders have released a large number of varieties — from selections with golden fronds to fantastically frilled fronds. Shown here is ‘Fluffy Ruffles’.

Name: Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Fluffy Ruffles’
Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light and high humidity
Size: To 7 feet tall and wide (but usually 2-3 feet tall and wide indoors)

Kokedama-String Garden|Space Gardening

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The days are getting longer, and the sun is shining more; I can’t think of a better time to get my hands into soil and play around with some fun plant experiments for spring! I’ve seen kokedama — Japanese moss balls — looking great hanging in homes, but I never realized how easy they are to create. Netherlands-based designer and all-around super-creative Aura Scaringi made this simple tutorial for crafting your own hanging kokedamagarden using a combination of peat soil and akedama, or bonsai soil.

HangingKokedama_Blog

 

Materials

  • a tiny plant; moss can’t stand direct sunlight, so choose a shadow-loving plant. I have used baby ferns, grass and another lovely plant with violet flowers, the name of which I can’t recall.
  • a 7:3 ratio of peat soil and akedama, or bonsai soil
  • dry sphagnum moss (you can buy a whole bag at most plant shops)
  • scissors
  • cotton thread
  • nice packing string like twine, hemp or sisal.
  • gloves. Yes, it WILL get messy.
  • a jar of water
  • moss, which you can either buy in a large box or pick yourself in the woods

Instructions

1. Remove as much soil as possible from your tiny plant so that its roots are exposed. Be very thorough but gentle!

2. Mix your peat and akedama soil together. You know the consistency is right when you are able to make a small ball from the earth without it breaking apart.

3. Now that your soil is mixed, start shaping it into a small, orange-sized ball. Use a little bit of water if needed. Think clay or pizza dough.

4. Make sure each ball has enough room to accommodate the roots of your plant.

5. Take a bunch of dry sphagnum moss and wrap it carefully around the roots, making a circular and compact shape. Then tie the cotton string around it several times. This will eventually dissolve.

6. Make a small hole in your soil ball, and gently press the plant inside it. Be careful to “close” the shape back to a sphere

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7. Now it’s time for the fun part: take small sheets of moss (any kind of moss) and press them firmly into the soil. Don’t leave any open spaces. Wrap the twine string around the ball as if you are packing a present, and leave the sides as long as needed.

8. Choose a nice, shady place, install a hook and hang your wonderful planet of moss.

9. YOU’RE DONE!

Here’s a video tutorial on how to make a string garden which you can follow.

Growing Citrus:5 Tips|Space Gardening

Growing Citrus Indoors

indoor-citrus-trees-southern-accents

As someone who’s obsessed with citrus fruit, I can’t imagine not having fresh satsumas or Washington navels during the holidays. The scent of the blossoms alone will instantly put me in a good mood. For those in less ideal citrus climates, you need not feel left out! You can grow the dwarf varieties of these trees indoors and reap the benefits by following a few simple steps:

1. Buy the right tree. Calamondin Orange, Improved Meyer Lemon, Ponderosa Lemon, Eureka Lemon, Persian or Bearss Lime, Eustis Limequat, Rangpur Lime, Otaheite Orange, Nippon Orangequat are all great varieties for beginning indoor cultivators.

2. Soil needs to be the correct pH and promote proper drainage. A range of 5-8 is best. You can get a pH test kit from your local nursery. A mixture of 1 part sand, 1 part peat and 1 part bark, perlite or vermiculite will serve your tree well. The soil should be loose enough to permit adequate but not excessive drainage. Any type of pot will do, but a 1″ – 2″ layer of gravel at the bottom of the pot will most readily promote drainage.

3. Citrus trees require a minimum of 5 hour of sunlight per day. Ideally, they should get 10-12. Supplemental lighting in the form of high intensity discharge lighting can be used to maximize your yield. One important thing to keep in mind is to slowly acclimate your trees if taking them from the outdoors to indoors for winter. Though acclimation isn’t necessary if only bringing them in for a few days to prevent freezing.

4. Humidity. Citrus trees will drop their leaves if the humidity grows too low in an indoor environment. Ideal humidity should be at 45 – 50%. Use a humidifier, if necessary.

5. Regular watering is necessary for your tree’s survival. When the top 2 inches of soil are dry, water (but don’t soak) the tree. If water pools in the saucer, empty the saucer. During warm summer months, you may need to water as often as twice daily. During winter months, water much more sparingly.

Indoor Desert Garden|Space Gardening

Cacti Grouping Resembles Desert Scene

 

When to Start: Spring

At Its Best: Early Summer

Time to Complete: 1 1/2 hours

Materials Needed:

  • shallow planting bowl
  • pebbles
  • cacti soil
  • sand
  • newspaper
  • spoon
  • heavy-duty gloves
  • watering can
  • miniature cacti; this selection includes: silver torch cactus, Mammillaria, elephant-ear pricklypear and Rebutia

Before You Start

Cacti famously survive on little water, but if you want them to grow and flower they should actually be watered regularly during the growing season. Giving them a thorough watering before planting will help the roots make good contact with the new soil, and they should grow very well.

Cacti Care

Aid Drainage

All cacti hate to sit in water, so make sure it will run freely through the growing medium, and out of the bottom of the pot. The container should have lots of drainage holes, covered by a layer of pebbles, to prevent the soil from clogging up the holes.

Cacti Need Drainage Holes with Pebbles on Bottom

Set Out the Plants

Put on your protective gloves and start arranging your plants. If you have chosen the position for each of your cacti before you start, planting will be easier and you are more likely to end up with a good overall effect. It makes sense to put smaller ones at the front and larger ones at the back, but also consider planting those with different habits, textures and flower color next to each other.

Cacti Variety

Planting Tips

Wrap a folded strip of newspaper around the top of the plant. This will help you slide it out of its pot and maneuver it into the larger planter without getting spines or fine hairs in your fingers. It also protects the plant.

Wrap Cacti in Newspaper Before Transplanting

Fill in the Gaps

Once the plants are in position, use a spoon to carefully fill the gaps between them with a cacti soil. Add small amounts of soil at a time and keep firming it down with the back of a spoon to ensure that there are no air holes left around the plant roots.

Pack Cacti Soil Around Plants to Eliminate Air Gap

Brush Off Soil

No matter how careful you are, some soil will inevitably get caught in the cactus spines and hairs. Use a soft brush to remove it and to keep the plants looking clean and neat.

Remove Soil from Cactus Spines With a Soft Brush

Water the Plants

Water all the plants in well. In summer, they can be watered whenever the surface of the soil dries out. In winter, they should be left dry; start watering again sparingly when you see signs of growth in spring.

Watering Cactus in Pots

Apply a Sand Mulch

Use the spoon to spread fine sand around the surface of the planter. This helps water quickly drain away from the surface, preventing rot, and gives the planter an authentic desertlike appearance. Set your arrangement in a bright, sunny position.

Authentic Desert Atmosphere

Top Tip: Watering Crowded Pots

Cacti are often sold when the plants are almost overflowing the sides of their pots, making it tricky to water them properly before planting. Sit these in a container of water until the root ball is damp.

Dampen a Cacti's Root Ball

Starting Indoor Garden|Space Gardening

Indoor gardening is fun and rewarding! Here I am going to share how to grow herbs and vegetables for your kitchen, and other indoor plants to decorate your home! Let’s unleash that inner gardener!

Are you a beginner gardener? Do you find all the info on the web daunting? I did too, but through my gardening adventure I’ve been building this site, writing articles and how-to in plain English so you can understand.

My Experience

Like you, I’m pretty new to the gardening game. The thing that got me interested in creating a garden indoors was cooking. There’s nothing better than a flavorsome meal with fresh herbs! I’ve been actively gardening for just under two years and really enjoying every moment of it.

Let’s Get Digging

There are lots of exciting things to learn about indoor gardening. It’s amazing how much you can grow indoors, and how creative you can be. There’s just so much more to it than popping a plant in a container and watering it! Here are a couple of things for you to get started with!

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  • Creating a productive indoor vegetable garden: You can grow vegetables in container for your kitchen. And the fun part is you can grow them beside your kitchen window.
  • Getting full enjoyment out of an indoor herb garden: Herbs are another good choice for indoor gardening as they grow in small pot and in medium lights.
  • Alternative ways of gardening such as hydroponics and aeroponics: Hydroponics and aeroponics are another type of indoor gardening. I will discuss about it in my upcoming posts.
  • Fantastic indoor plants to brighten up your home: Many indoor plants such as pothos, mother-in-laws tongue, palm trees, etc. are good for your indoor environment. These plants are known as air purifying plants.
  • Terrariums, wonderful mini-greenhouses can make fantastic decorations for your home.

My indoor gardening journey of discovery has led me to discover so many different aspects to gardening indoors. I’ve learnt lots of useful tips and how to make a hanging planter to accent my balcony garden.

Beautiful flower pot framing house entrance

Beautiful flower pot framing house entrance